May 21, 2022  
Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED 2017-2018 
    
Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 610 - Foundations of Accounting and Business Law

    3 credits
    Introduction to the fundamental principles of financial accounting and business law. Emphasis is placed on preparing and analyzing the four basic financial statements and applying basic accounting principles to accounts receivable, fixed assets, depreciation, inventory valuation, internal control, liabilities, and equity. Business Law topics include the US legal system, torts, and contracts.
  
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    ACCT 725 - Accounting for Managers

    3 credits
    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the accounting concepts, techniques, computer applications, and issues in costing and accounting measurement for management planning, decision-making, and control. Prerequisite(s): ACCT 211 or equivalent

Biology

  
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    BIOL 592 - Topics

    1-5 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Business Administration

  
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    BADM 538 - Entrepreneurship II

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the process of screening an opportunity, drafting a personal entrepreneurial strategy, and understanding the business plan writing process. Building the entrepreneurial team and the acquisition and management of financial resources are emphasized along with venture growth, harvest strategies, and valuation.
  
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    BADM 576 - Marketing Research

    3 credits
    This course provides an in-depth study of the primary methodologies of marketing research. Emphasis is placed on collecting, analyzing, interpreting and presenting information for the purpose of reducing uncertainty surrounding marketing and management decisions. Prerequisite(s): BADM 370 and BADM 220 or MATH 281
  
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    BADM 593 - Workshop

    1-3 credits
    Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may include lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity.
  
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    BADM 610 - Foundations of Economics and Finance

    3 credits
    This course provides an overview of microeconomic principles and business finance and incorporates significant information technology integration. Topics include the study of microeconomics concepts as they relate to the consumer, worker, and business decisions. Emphasis is given to satisfaction maximizing behavior by individuals and profit maximization by firms. Market structures are thoroughly analyzed regarding their effect on price, out, and competitiveness. Topics in business finance include an overview of financial theory including the time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure theory, asset pricing, risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, and bond and stock valuation. Technology integration includes some or all of the following: The use of Internet-based resources to supply data for analysis and information on current issues relevant to the course; the use of simulations, games, and computer applications to reinforce economic concepts, and the introduction of software tools that enhance the summary and presentation of economic information in a professional setting.
  
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    BADM 660 - Foundations of Business Practice

    3 credits
    Provides conceptual background and fundamental knowledge about management and marketing to graduate students as preparation to take core courses in the MBA program.
  
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    BADM 692 - Topics

    1-4 credits
    A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.
  
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    BADM 712 - Advanced Business Finance

    3 credits
    This course emphasizes the application of financial theory and concepts to the development of effective financial strategies for maximization of the firm value and shareholder wealth. Topics include capital budgeting, cash flow analysis, capital structure, cost of capital, working capital management, and security valuation, as well as effective spreadsheet analyses. Prerequisite(s): BADM 310 or equivalent
  
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    BADM 729 - Business Analysis for Managerial Decisions

    3 credits
    Managerial decision making for contemporary problems encountered by the business professional, including forecasting, decision analysis, linear programming, transportation models, project scheduling, inventory, and waiting line models; basic understanding and evaluation of operations research techniques, use of available computer routines and interpretation of results. Prerequisite(s): BADM 220
  
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    BADM 750 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

    3 credits
    Essential legal and ethical foundation for business managers. Emphasizes effective strategies for managers to prevent and resolve legal disputes against companies. Topics include business ethics, the US legal system, international law, legal issues related to the corporate form of doing business, forming and enforcing contracts, minimizing tort liability, managing debtor-creditor relations, and retaining and managing company employees. Legal databases will be utilized. Prerequisite(s): BADM 350 or equivalent
  
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    BADM 755 - Organizational Behavior and Human Resources Management Process

    3 credits
    This course provides practical application of organizational behavior concepts and addresses how they affect employee motivation, group dynamics, communication, coordination, change, and adaptation within an organization. It integrates psychological and sociological concepts with the human resource management process. Prerequisite(s): BADM 360 or equivalent
  
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    BADM 765 - Management and Leadership

    3 credits
    This course is a study of general management, including the planning, directing, controlling, and coordinating of activities involved in operating a business, government, or not-for-profit organization, with special emphasis on leadership. Prerequisite(s): BADM 360 or equivalent
  
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    BADM 768 - International Management

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the management policies and actions required in an internationally-oriented firm, with special emphasis on cultural, legal, and political factors that influence business operation in foreign countries. Prerequisite(s): BADM 360 or equivalent
  
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    BADM 775 - Strategic Marketing

    3 credits
    This course focuses on two strategic aspects of technology and marketing: the application of technology on marketing activities and the strategies associated with the marketing of technology products. Segmentation, positioning, and marketing mix with issues within a global technology environment will be emphasized as part of the strategic marketing planning process. Prerequisite(s): BADM 370 or equivalent
  
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    BADM 782 - Strategic Management and Decision Making

    3 credits
    This course is a study of organization-wide management and long-range decision making. It is a capstone course and assumes prior completion of the majority of the DSU MBA curriculum. Finance, Marketing, Accounting, MIS, Economics, and Management knowledge learned in other MBA courses is used in student preparation of a semester-long project focused on current strategy topics and issues.
  
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    BADM 789 - Master's Research Problems/Projects Sustaining

    0 credits
    This is a zero credit hour schedule type used to track students who are not currently working with faculty on thesis or doctoral activities. Universities may require students to register under this schedule type to remain active degree candidates.
  
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    BADM 790 - Seminar

    1-3 credits
    A highly focused and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems, and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media, such as internet, and are at the upper division or graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to 20 or fewer students.
  
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    BADM 791 - Independent Study

    1-4 credits
    Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    BADM 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.

Computer Education

  
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    CED 592 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Computer Education and Technology

  
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    CET 657 - Network and Operating Systems Topics

    2 credits
    This course will provide an overview of the South Dakota K-12 network and operating systems. Topics will include, but are not limited to: installing, configuring, and deploying Microsoft Windows XP clients; managing and coordinating the various facets of Microsoft's Windows 2003 Server; and managing and deploying Active Directory.
  
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    CET 692 - Topics

    1-4 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    CET 720 - Leading Evaluation and Change in the Educational Technology Environment

    3 credits
    Methods and principles for evaluating instructional technology plans, products and participants during each stage of the instructional systems development process.  The course applies change theory as a basis for understanding the adoption and use of educational technology tools strategies and procedures.
  
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    CET 721 - Web Authoring

    1 credit
    This course is an introduction to web authoring in education. The course consists of two components: information presentation in hypermedia (using FrontPage), and digital graphic creation. Participants will learn the fundamentals in these two areas as well as their applications in educational settings.
  
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    CET 725 - Educational Applications for Mobile Devices

    3 credits
    A survey of the technology tools in the mobile learning environment access age level and content area.  Questioning and sharing information and best practices on how Mobile Devices can best be applied to improve learning outcomes.  Current focus will be Android and iOS based devices, with modifications implemented as needed to meet changing technology developments.
  
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    CET 726 - Technology in Curriculum

    3 credits
    The course promotes the systematic design and development of computer-based and related technologies curriculum. The course also examines the impact of technology on the teaching and learning process.
  
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    CET 749 - Policy and Management for Distance Education

    3 credits
    Using the systems approach, this course examines the model of governance of distance education organizations. The course focuses on identification and analysis of the institutional policies, management procedures and strategic planning efforts necessary to managing distance education programs in a way that is engaging and equitable to the learner. Topics include: conducting needs assessment, preparing new programming tools, market plans, developing budgets and management plans, developing program evaluations, and so on. Prerequisite(s): LT 741 
  
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    CET 750 - Multimedia II

    2 credits
    Developing computer-based educational software using hypermedia, authoring languages, telecommunications, and programming languages based on current educational research.
  
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    CET 751 - Computing Hardware and Networking Essentials

    3 credits
    A study of computer hardware and networks used in the educational setting. Topics include hardware maintenance and upgrade, network wiring, topologies, planning, installation, and maintenance of computer networks. This course requires a 5-6 day summer on-campus residency.
  
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    CET 753 - Network Management in Education Institutions

    3 credits
    Network management of educational institutions networks. Topics include protocols, security, configuration of storage, backup and performance, printing, remote access, virtual private networks, tuning and troubleshooting.
  
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    CET 756 - Introduction to Instructional Programming

    2 credits
    Computer programming to promote human/computer interaction, especially as it applies to students and education. Emphasis on applying fundamental programming concepts and proper programming techniques to instruction.
  
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    CET 788 - Master's Research Problems/Projects

    2 credits
    Independent research problems/projects that lead to research or design paper, but not to a thesis. The plan of study is negotiated by the faculty member and the candidate. Contact between the two may be extensive and intensive. Does not include research courses which are theoretical.
  
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    CET 789 - Master's Research Problem/Project Sustaining

    0 credits
    This is a zero-credit instructional method type used to track students who are not currently working with faculty on thesis or doctoral activities. Universities may require students to register under this instructional method type to remain active degree candidates.
  
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    CET 790 - Seminar

    1-2 credits
    A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems, and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as internet and are at the upper division or graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students.
  
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    CET 791 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Includes Directed Study, Problems, Readings, Directed Readings, Special Problems, and Special Projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    CET 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    CET 795 - Practicum

    1-3 credits
    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    CET 798 - Thesis

    4 credits
    A formal treatise presenting the results of study submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the applicable degree. The process requires extensive and intensive one-on-one interaction between the candidate and professor with more limited interaction between and among the candidate and other members of the committee.

Computer Science

  
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    CSC 509 - System and Security Programming

    3 credits
    This course will examine programs and programming from the perspective of systems-level operations and security issues. The course will address appropriate operating systems, utilities and tools; malware fundamentals; systems-level programming; and scripting. Understanding the essentials of programming from device drivers and assembly language through scripting languages for automating processes and gluing together other utility programs will be the course objective. Coursework will focus on understanding and reading ability for such programs and scripts; students will develop the ability to understand and modify such programs in order to tailor them to particular environments. Open Source tools will be a consistent theme throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): CSC 150 and CSC 250
  
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    CSC 533 - Computer Graphics

    3 credits
    Principles of computer graphics.  A study of the algorithms used to generate raster and vector graphics. Prerequisite(s): CSC 300 Data Structure
  
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    CSC 547 - Artificial Intelligence

    3 credits
    Introduction to ideas, issues and applications of Artificial Intelligence.  Knowledge representation, problem solving, search, inference techniques, theorem proving expert systems.  Artificial intelligence programming languages.
  
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    CSC 586 - Data Mining

    3 credits
    Study of analytic processes which explore data for consistent patterns or systematic relationships, along with the study of methods for preparing data for analysis and validating the results of such analysis.  Although the course will focus on the processes, techniques, and algorithms for data mining, it will also give an introduction to the basic techniques in specific areas such as association rule mining, classification, clustering, data warehousing and online analytic processing.  Assumes at least one undergraduate Statistics course or equivalent.
  
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    CSC 591 - Independent Study

    1-4 credits
    Directed Study, Problems, Readings, Directed Readings, Special Problems, and Special Projects.  Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.  The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans.  Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students.  Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topics.
  
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    CSC 592 - Topics

    1-5 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    CSC 691 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Includes Directed Study, Problems, Readings, Directed Readings, Special Problems, and Special Projects.  Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.  The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans.  Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students.  Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topics.
  
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    CSC 692 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics.  A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field.  Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum.  Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors.  Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students which significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    CSC 705 - Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms

    3 credits
    Design and analysis of algorithms to determine their time and space requirements.  The study of efficient algorithms for various computational problems.  Analysis of specific algorithms for internal sorting, hashing, and string search.  Sorting manipulation of data structures, graphics, matrix multiplication, the Fast Fourier Transform, arithmetical operations and pattern matching.  Study and implication of advanced topics on lists, stacks, trees, sets and dynamic allocation.
  
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    CSC 710 - Structure and Design Programming Language

    3 credits
    Evolution of concepts in programming languages.  Data and control abstraction.  Run-time effects of binding, scope and extent; structure of ALGOL-like and interpretive languages.  Data types, problem areas and implementation models.  Control structures, exception handling, and concurrency.  Functional programming.
  
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    CSC 712 - Data Structures

    3 credits
    This study of advanced and emerging data structures will include the study of classic advanced data structure.  The course will also introduce data structure issues related to emerging application spaces that are exploiting such things as large data sets, unstructured data, etc.
  
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    CSC 714 - Database Systems

    3 credits
    Emphasis will be placed on database theory and will cover, transaction management, processing, correctness, recoverability, serialization, concurrency control, security, distributed databases and optimization.  Emerging topics in databases will also be addressed such as Massively Large Datasets, Unstructured Data, NOSQL, etc.  Assumes working knowledge of SQL and the Relational Model.
  
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    CSC 716 - Secure Software Engineering

    3 credits
    This course introduces both theoretical and practical approaches to securing software engineering processes.  Special attention will be paid to requirements elicitation and specification of secure systems, secure software design approaches, secure software development best practices, integration of software components into secure environments and the configuration and execution of software security toolsets.  Students will not only be exposed to practical approaches and tools to create and implement secure software, but they will also be exposed to cutting-edge secure software engineering technical research papers.  It is expected students have a strong computer science background and are prepared to create, review, audit and exploit software packages.
  
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    CSC 718 - Operating Systems & Parallel Programming

    3 credits
    This course provides a graduate-level introduction to parallel and distributed systems and introduces fundamentals of shared and distributed memory programming to provide hands-on experience of parallel computing. The course will explore algorithms and techniques for programming shared-memory (e.g., multicores) and distributed-memory (e.g., clusters) computer systems.  The course will include both theoretical and programming components. Includes the study of parallel computer architecture, memory and I/O. Also, parallel computer algorithms to include shared and distributed memory, parallel computation models, graphic algorithms, and numerical algorithms.
  
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    CSC 720 - Theory of Computation

    3 credits
    Formal models of computation.  Recursive function theory, computable functions, decidable and enumerable sets, unsolvable programs, correctness of programs, undecidability and incompleteness and complexity of computation.
  
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    CSC 722 - Machine Learning Fundamentals

    3 Credits
    A comprehensive study of the theory and the implementation of principle machine learning algorithms. Topics include supervised and unsupervised learning methods for classification, prediction, and decision making.
  
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    CSC 744 - Software Development Leadership

    3 credits
    A study of the activities that are needed to lead a modern software development project.  Various methodologies, models, and tools will be explored.  Students will also be introduced to codes of conduct and ethical situations that may arise during a project.  Additional topics will include software quality, development practices, team dynamics, and leadership styles.
  
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    CSC 748 - Software Exploitation

    3 credits
    This course is designed to expose students to advanced exploitation techniques.  Topics include the use of automated exploitation tools as well as the process of exploitation discovery and development.  Vulnerability analysis, debugging, fuzzing, shellcode, and mitigation techniques will be explored.  Both Windows and Linux platforms will be covered.
  
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    CSC 770 - Software Engineering Management

    3 credits
    Management issues arise in the development of software systems. The topics include planning documentation for requirements, design, implementation and testing, cost projection and modeling, documentation standards, code control, tracking of defects management psychology, group interaction and communication, and the management of reviews and walkthroughs. Prerequisite(s): CSC 470
  
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    CSC 790 - Seminar

    1-3 credits
    A highly focused, and topical course.  The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems, and research.  Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as internet and are at the upper division graduate levels.  Enrollment is generally limited to fewer than 20 students.
  
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    CSC 791 - Independent Study

    1-5 credits
    Includes Directed Study, Problems, Readings, Directed Readings, Special Problems and Special Projects.  Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.  The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans.  Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students.  Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topics.
  
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    CSC 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics.  A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field.  Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum.  Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors.  Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    CSC 794 - Internship

    1-3 credits
    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid.  Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study.  A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses.
  
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    CSC 798 - Thesis

    1-9 credits
    A formal treatise presenting the results of study submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the applicable degree.  The process requires extensive and intensive one-on-one interaction between the candidate and professor with more limited interaction between and among the candidate and other members of the committee.
  
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    CSC 803 - An Introduction to Cyber Security Research

    3 credits
    An introduction to cyber security research where students will gain knowledge in identifying research sources, gathering applicable research materials, and how to better categorize and analyze the current state of research.  Students will gain knowledge in transitioning from gathered research artifacts to authorizing sections of research papers applicable for submission to journals and conferences.  Special attention will be paid to citation standards, anti-plagiarism and scientific writing styles.
  
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    CSC 804 - Cyber Security Research Methodologies

    3 Credits
    This course develops skills needed in quantitative, qualitative and design science research methodologies. Students will acquire skills in the development of research proposals for each of the three methodologies normally used in cybersecurity research.
  
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    CSC 807 - Cyber Security Research

    3 credits
    This course focuses on research issues pertaining to Cyber Security research.  During this seminar course, students will examine and evaluate the research literature from a wide variety of sources, both academic and applied.  Students will also identify various research frontiers associated with cyber security.
  
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    CSC 809 - Dissertation Preparation

    3 credits
    Students will formalize, present, and defend a dissertation proposal with guidance from a faculty dissertation chair.  By working closely with a faculty member, each student should have a developed dissertation proposal in a specific research field of cyber security that it agreed upon by both student and faculty member. Prerequisite(s): CSC 807 
  
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    CSC 840 - Cyber Operations I

    3 credits
    An in-depth study of cyber operations content; includes: Principles of Security, Legal Issues, Networking, and Offensive Cyber Operations techniques to mitigate cyber threats.
  
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    CSC 841 - Cyber Operations II

    3 Credits
    An in-depth study of cyber operations content; including topics such as wireless security, applied cryptography, cellular mobile, and cyber defense from a proactive position, focusing on the anticipation of a cyber-attack.
  
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    CSC 842 - Security Tool Development

    3 credits
    A software development class that emphasizes custom scripts and software tools to conduct specialized security assessment in an automated manner.  Students will learn to rapidly develop custom tools that are applicable in both attacking and defending software systems and network environments.  The course will also include analyzing current open sources security tools to identify and develop extensions and additional functionality.
  
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    CSC 844 - Advanced Reverse Engineering

    3 credits
    An in-depth investigation into advanced software reverse engineering procedures and associated software packages.  Heavy emphasis will be placed on reading, understanding, and manipulating Assembly language and computer architecture.
  
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    CSC 846 - Advanced Malware Analysis

    3 credits
    This course covers advanced techniques used in malware analysis. Topics will focus heavily on static analysis of unknown binaries utilizing reverse engineering tools and procedures.  The course will also cover advanced anti-malware analysis processes such as: Anti-reverse engineering methods and advanced obfuscation practices employing packers and anti-debugging processes.  A solid understanding of x86 assembly language and a familiarity of IDA pro are suggested.
  
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    CSC 848 - Advanced Software Exploitation

    3 credits
    This course is designed to expose students to advanced software exploitation techniques including but not limited to: heap and ROP exploitation, by passing DEP and ASLR, reverse engineering, and custom shell code creation. Students should be familiar with the use of automated exploitation tools and have a solid understanding of manual exploitation in a Windows and Linux environment including: crash analysis, debugging, fuzzing, shell code generation and more.
  
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    CSC 890 - Seminar

    1 credit
    A highly focused and topical course.  The format includes student presentations and discussion of reports based on literature, practices, problems and research.  Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as Internet and are at the upper division or graduate levels.  At DSU this on-site research seminar is intended to acquaint students with contemporary cyber security research issues, allow students to report, present and discuss articles pertinent to cyber security research.
  
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    CSC 891 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.  The faculty member and student negotiate the details of the study plans.  Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students.  Meetings depend upon the requirements of the topics.
  
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    CSC 892 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics.  A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field.  Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum.  Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors.  Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.
  
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    CSC 898 - Program Sustaining

    0 credits
    Program sustaining course for students in the doctorate program.
  
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    CSC 898D - Dissertation

    1-22 credits
    A formal treatise presenting the results of study submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the applicable degree.  The process requires extensive and intensive one-on-one interaction between the candidate and professor with more limited interaction between and among the candidate and other members of the committee.
  
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    CSC 899D - Dissertation Sustaining

    0 credits
    This is a zero-credit instructional method type using to track students who are not currently working with faculty on thesis or research activities.  University may require students to register under this instructional method type to remain active degree candidates.

Economics

  
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    ECON 730 - Economics for Decision Making

    3 credits
    This course utilizes micro- and macroeconomic theory and empirical analysis to improve decision-making skills and incorporates significant information technology integration. Major microeconomics topics include demand analysis and estimation, cost analysis and estimation, market structures, pricing strategies, and game theory. Major macroeconomics topics include the operation of credit markets, monetary and fiscal policy, analysis and prediction of macroeconomic variables, foreign currency markets, and international trade. Technology integration includes some or all of the following: The use of Internet-based resources to supply data for analysis and information on current issues relevant to the course; the use of simulations, games, and computer applications to reinforce economic concepts; and the introduction of software tools that enhance the summary and presentation of economic information in a professional setting. Prerequisite(s): ECON 201, ECON 202 and BADM 220 or equivalent

Education

  
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    ED 592 - Topics

    1-4 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    ED 692 - Topics

    1-4 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    ED 695 - Practicum

    1-4 credits
    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor

Education Administration

  
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    EDAD 701 - Introduction to Educational Administration

    3 credits
    An introduction to (1) the organization, administration, and control of public education and (2) the profession of educational administration, including task, process, and activity analysis.
  
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    EDAD 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics.  A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field.  Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum.  Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors.  Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Elementary Education

  
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    ELED 564 - Linguistics/Language P-12

    3 credits
    This course will introduce the key components of language including phonology, phonetics, morphology, syntax and semantics and develop a basic understanding of language acquisition for P-12 students learning English as a new language.
  
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    ELED 592 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    ELED 593 - Workshop

    1-3 credits
    Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may include lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity.

English

  
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    ENGL 592 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Foundations of Education

  
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    EDFN 575 - Human Relations

    3 credits
    This course is designed to reflect the six strands of the human relations component as mandated by the South Dakota Board of Education. Students will develop expertise in listening and communicating to create a climate within the school environment that is more conducive to learning. The course is also designed to help the participants understand the community issues in education and to encourage the teachers to be more aware of ways to strengthen community involvement in the school. Another area that will be addressed is the dehumanizing impact of biases and negative stereotyping.
  
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    EDFN 790 - Seminar

    1-3 credits
    A highly focused, and topical course. The format includes student presentations and discussions of reports based on literature, practices, problems, and research. Seminars may be conducted over electronic media such as internet and are at the upper division graduate levels. Enrollment is generally limited to few than 20 students.
  
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    EDFN 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Health Information Management Systems

  
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    HIMS 701 - Foundations in Healthcare Information

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of healthcare information infrastructure in the United States. Emphasis is placed on health record content and how it relates to such issues as reimbursement, quality improvement, risk management, accreditation standards, related federal laws, secondary data.  Electronic health record implementation, management, and required standards will be introduced.
  
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    HIMS 742 - Healthcare Informatics, Information Systems and Technology

    3 credits
    This course introduces the discipline of health informatics and covers emerging trends.  Various information systems, technologies and applications utilized in the context of healthcare are introduced.  Their characteristics, strengths, challenges, purpose, and impact are taught.  The impact on consumers, populations, and healthcare providers is emphasized.  Factors influencing adoption and use of various clinical and health information systems and technologies are taught.  Key information systems and technology such as electronic health records, health information exchanges, personal health records, public health information systems, mobile health technologies, interoperability, and telemedicine are introduced in this course. Prerequisite(s): HIMS 701 
  
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    HIMS 744 - Data Analytics in Healthcare

    3 credits
    This course teaches using both administrative and clinical healthcare data to make decisions and transform healthcare delivery and the health of individuals and populations.  The course concentrates on both big and small data, structured and unstructured data, and public secondary data sources.  Tools, applications, and approaches for health care data analytics are taught.  This course covers topics such as statistical approaches and tools, data analysis, and data visualization. Prerequisite(s): HIMS 701 INFS 608  and INFS 760  
  
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    HIMS 745 - Legal and Ethical Aspects of Health Informatics

    3 credits
    This course explores health regulations, standards, and compliance techniques including the topics of: privacy and confidentiality of patient information (including patient rights), information security practices, clinical and health IT standards, health information exchanges, personal health records, e-discovery, vendor contracting and negotiation considerations, and ethics. Prerequisite(s): HIMS 701  
  
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    HIMS 746 - Health Information Lifecycle Governance

    3 credits
    This course explores health information governance program and policy development and best practices in data management, health application optimization, and health informatics throughout the information lifecycle.  Topics of data governance, metadata management, master data management and data quality management will be included as well as discussion of vendor selection and relationship management. Prerequisite(s): HIMS 742  and INFS 760 
  
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    HIMS 747 - Leadership and Management for Health Informatics

    3 credits
    This course explores leadership skills of communication, negotiation, change management and the strategic alignment of IT and organizational goals.  Topics also include financial, personnel, and vendor relationship management. Prerequisite(s): HIMS 701  
  
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    HIMS 748 - Research Design in Health Informatics

    3 credits
    This course introduces the basic methods for undertaking research and program evaluation within health services organizations and systems.  Special emphasis will be placed on the advanced use of healthcare data to support research, advances in medicine, and quality initiatives. Prerequisite(s): HIMS 744  
 

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