Jan 20, 2022  
Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED 2017-2018 
    
Graduate Catalog ARCHIVED 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Health Information Management Systems

  
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    HIMS 751 - Classification Systems and the Revenue Cycle

    3 Credits
    An introduction to the principles of taxonomy and the purpose of classifying diseases and procedures with the various clinical vocabularies, classification, and nomenclature systems used in US health care system.  This course will explore the role of these classification systems in the health care revenue cycle and examine the relationship to clinical documentation improvement strategies, merit-based incentive payment systems, value based purchasing programs and fraud surveillance. Prerequisite(s): HIMS 701  
  
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    HIMS 758 - Workflow and Usability Optimization in Health Informatics

    3 Credits
    This course explores workflow and process reengineering techniques used in the study of human factors and usability in health informatics.  Workflow topics include process mapping and workflow management.  Methods for studying the computer-human interaction in healthcare, including optimal interface designs for health informatics software, will be explored using human factors engineering principles and usability testing techniques.  Prerequisite(s): HIMS 742  
  
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    HIMS 788 - Master's Research Prob/Project

    3 credits


    Independent research problems/projects that lead to research or design paper, but not to a thesis. The plan of study is negotiated by the faculty member and the candidate. Contact between the two may be extensive and intensive. Does not include research courses which are theoretical.

    Students will complete an applied project or research project developed to integrate the specialized skills and knowledge presented throughout other courses in the masters in health informatics curriculum.  Prior permission and approval of the project is required.  Students will work closely with a project supervisor and project committee.

      Corequisite(s): HIMS 748  

  
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    HIMS 789 - Master's Research/Project Sustaining

    0 credits
    This is a zero-credit instructional method type used to track students who are not currently working with faculty on thesis or doctoral activities. Universities may require students to register under this instructional method type to remain active degree candidates.
  
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    HIMS 791 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depend upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    HIMS 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.
  
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    HIMS 794 - Internship

    3 Credits
    Field-based learning experience for which the student may or not be paid.  Students gain practical experience related to health informatics concepts.  Prior approval of the internship is required.
  
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    HIMS 820 - Current Issues Health Informatics

    3 credits
    Current trends and issues in health informatics and recent research, theory, and developments in health informatics.

History

  
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    HIST 588 - Introduction to Grand Strategy

    3 credits
    To introduce students to the politics and conduct of war and diplomacy.  Students will read, discuss, and write about the leading strategic thinkers to gain an introductory understanding to strategy making.  The course will be structured in such a way that the students will compare and contrast wars and leading military thinkers in order to understand how wars are won and how leaders achieve their aims.  The course explores political and cultural structures, history, diplomacy, literature and religion in order to examine the material in a comprehensive manner.

Humanities

  
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    HUM 601 - Digital HumanitIes Methods, Practices, and Principles

    3 Credits
    This course introduces Digital Humanities skills.  The focus will be less on the theoretical and foundational components and more on the development of critical skills, the course will encourage a critical assessment of the methods, practices and principles in digital, computational and new media fields.  Topics might include: collection, databases,s text encoding, electronic texts, visualization, digital resources and new media.
  
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    HUM 602 - Interdisciplinary Reading Seminar in Digital Humanities

    3 Credits
    An in-depth, seminar-style course focusing on scholarly approaches and literature in digital humanities, new media theory, computational history and related topics.
  
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    HUM 710 - Digital Humanities Practicum/Project

    3 Credits
    This capstone style course will require the student to produce and publish online an innovative digital project of his or her own design.  Options may range from producing a conventional research essay in an innovative digital form, to creating a sample electronic edition and writing a rationale to support it, to building and explaining a media database or digital tool that demonstrates important theoretical and practical points in digital humanities work.  The projects should be related to the student's research agenda/thesis plans.  Seminar can be repeated.

Indian Education

  
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    INED 511 - South Dakota Indian Studies

    3 credits
    A basic knowledge of Indian history with emphasis on the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota speaking people. Current cultural issues are presented including values, family structures, traditional religion, fine arts, legends, economics, governmental policies, treaties, acts and related areas. Focuses on teaching methods, content and materials to equip students to teach bi-culturally.

Information Assurance

  
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    INFA 592 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.
  
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    INFA 701 - Principles of Information Assurance

    3 credits
    This course covers key bodies of knowledge and specializations in security, privacy, and compliance associated with enterprise information systems. The course explores defense-in-depth techniques of layering people, process and technology controls to secure the enterprise. Topics include information security law, ethics, security concepts and mechanisms; security technologies; authentication mechanisms; mandatory and discretionary controls; basic cryptography and its applications; digital forensics, biometrics database security, intrusion detection and prevention, anonymity and privacy issues for information systems. Emerging frameworks and tools are explored to complete the student's foundational understanding of information assurance.
  
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    INFA 713 - Managing Security Risks

    3 credits
    Information technology holds the potential to create strategic, operational, financial, and reputational issues for an organization. Information technology risk management science provides decision-makers with the information needed to determine information security risk so decisions can be made regarding risk mitigation. This course is a study of the existing risk management frameworks, models, processes and tools to equip students with the theory, science and practical knowledge to operationalize risk management in an organization or government agency. Topics include outsourcing and off-shoring risks, and their mitigation through third party risk management programs. Students will examine cutting-edge risk management science to understand the future of information technology risk management.
  
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    INFA 715 - Data Privacy

    3 credits
    This course explores computational techniques for releasing information in such a way that data privacy cannot be violated and provides a formal framework for privacy-enhancing technologies and models of privacy protection. It explores privacy enhancements from economic, legal and policy perspectives and introduces cutting-edge, privacy-preserving frameworks for data-mining systems.
  
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    INFA 719 - Software Security

    3 credits
    This course addresses principles, techniques, and best practices for developing secure software applications. It emphasizes the security ramifications for different phases of software development processes, including security requirements analysis, secure design, secure implementation, and security testing and verification.
  
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    INFA 720 - Incident Response

    3 credits
    This course provides theoretical and practical aspects of incident response.  Students will learn now to respond to information security incidents and understand how the incident occurred.  Response, mitigation, and policy will be included in this course with both an applied and managerial approach.  A focus on current tools and methodologies will be stressed.
  
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    INFA 721 - Computer Forensics

    3 credits
    Identifying, acquiring, preserving, and analyzing electronic evidence from single machines, networks, and internet. It will explore both technical and legal issues of computer forensics investigations. Topics include forensics law and regulation issues, incidence response, open and commercial tools, evidence recovery theory and practice of computer file systems, memory, registry, network logs and communications. Special focus will be given to windows systems and networks.
  
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    INFA 723 - Cryptography

    3 credits
    This course covers fundamentals of cryptography and its applications, classical and contemporary ciphers, encryption and decryption and breaking ciphers. Cryptographic applications, protocols, applications of cryptography and automated tools to analyze cryptographic protocols are examined.
  
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    INFA 732 - Malware Analysis

    3 credits
    This course provides fundamental knowledge of malware analysis.  Topics include an introduction to both static and dynamic techniques for analyzing unknown binaries.  Students will be exposed to advanced malware concepts including malware detection as well as the utilization of industry standard tools to analyze, debug, and reverse engineer unknown binaries.
  
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    INFA 735 - Offensive Security

    3 credits
    This course provides theoretical and practical aspects of network and web application penetration testing.  The course includes in-depth details and hands-on labs for each phase of an ethical hack including, but not limited to: reconnaissance, vulnerability assessment, exploitation, maintaining access, and covering tracks.  An applied approach with a focus on current tools and methodologies will be stressed.
  
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    INFA 739 - Software Quality Assurance

    3 credits
    This course is intended to acquaint the students with principles, techniques, and best practices of software quality assurance, concentrating on software testing and verification. It will cover functional testing, structural testing, regression testing, test automation, specification-based testing, code review, formal modeling, model-based testing, and model checking.
  
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    INFA 742 - Ethics and Information Technology

    3 credits
    Ethics and Information Technology concerns the ethical dilemmas that exist where human beings, information objects, and social computing technologies interact.  The course explores emerging ethical models from historical and cross-cultural perspectives and then applies these models to a variety of new and emerging technologies that are inherently social in their construction and use.  The course challenges students to explore ethics by using a case-study format in which technologists and information custodians must decide what to do.
     
  
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    INFA 745 - Compliance and Audit

    3 credits
    This course examines fundamental concepts in IT security audit and control processes for the financial industry, including the control framework, attendant control objectives and reporting systems for an organization. Students learn to create a control structure, audit an IT infrastructure against it, and establish systematic remediation procedures. As part of the learning process, students have an opportunity to be certified as a CISA (Certified Information System Auditor).
  
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    INFA 751 - Wireless Security

    3 credits
    A technical perspective on maintaining the availability, integrity, and confidentiality of wireless networks. Covers a wide range of technical issues, including wireless communication fundamentals, wireless network configuration, security standards, wireless vulnerabilities, attacks and countermeasures.
  
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    INFA 789 - Master's Research Problems/Projects Sustaining

    0 credits
    This is a zero credit hour schedule type used to track students who are not currently working with faculty on thesis or doctoral activities. Universities may require students to register under this schedule type to remain active degree candidates.
  
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    INFA 791 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Includes Directed Study, Problems, Readings, Directed Readings, Special Problems, and Special Projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    INFA 792 - Topics

    3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    INFA 794 - Internship

    1-3 credits
    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with Field Experience courses.

Information Systems

  
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    INFS 592 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    INFS 601 - Information Systems

    3 credits
    Systems theory, quality, decision making, and the organizational role of information systems are introduced. Information technology including computing hardware, software and telecommunications systems are integrated into the alignment with the Enterprise's Strategy and Key Business Processes.
  
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    INFS 605 - Foundations of Programming

    3 credits
    Planning, coding, and testing computer programs such as Object Structures that can be used for business applications. Emphasis will be on Data Theory and programming event driven graphical user interfaces.
  
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    INFS 608 - Applied Statistics

    3 credits
    This course presents an overview of statistical concepts and techniques and incorporates significant information technology integration. Statistical techniques covered in this class would include sampling, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, inference procedures for population characteristics, and linear regression. Utilization of statistical software is incorporated. Technology integration includes some or all of the following: The use of Internet-based resources to supply data for analysis and information on current issues relevant to the course; the use of simulations, games, and computer applications to reinforce statistical concepts, and the introduction of software tools that enhance the summary and presentation of statistical data and analysis in a professional setting.
  
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    INFS 614 - Introduction to Research

    3 credits
    The course presents concepts and skills necessary to formulate, design, and execute research projects with particular emphasis on information systems research. Topics include: Definition of research and the nature of scientific inquiry, components of the research project, finding and using the literature of the discipline, managing the research project, writing and presenting, and an overview of research methods.
  
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    INFS 692 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    INFS 720 - System Analysis and Design Using Case Tools

    3 credits
    A study of the advanced theory and practice of systems analysis and design concepts and techniques, with an emphasis on the design part of the systems analysis process. Computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools and Human Computer Interaction are also emphasized. Prerequisite(s): INFS 601 
  
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    INFS 724 - Project and Change Management

    3 credits
    A study of the principles and techniques used in managing information systems and organizational change projects. Project management software will be used in this course.
  
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    INFS 730 - Web Application Development

    3 credits
    An introduction to client and server side web programming. Client-side topics include HTML compliance and server-side code will be utilized to create dynamic web sites.  There is a substantial programming component in the course. Prerequisite(s): INFS 605 
  
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    INFS 732 - Emerging Technologies and Issues

    3 credits
    The course provides an understanding of both technical and managerial issues, as well as strategic implications of emerging technologies and issues. Prerequisite(s): INFS 605  
  
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    INFS 734 - Multi-tiered and Service-Oriented Architectures

    3 credits
    An advanced application development course that focuses on developing enterprise dynamic data-driven applications using multi-tiered and service-oriented architectures.  Students will be exposed to contemporary software platforms and tools for enterprise application development. Prerequisite(s): INFS 605  
  
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    INFS 736 - Technology for Mobile Devices

    3 credits
    This course introduces web pages and style sheets for mobile devices and then focuses on developing applications for various Smartphones, Tablets and other mobile devices. Prerequisite(s):  
  
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    INFS 750 - IT Infrastructure, Technology and Network Management

    3 credits
    A study of IT Infrastructure, systems, and networks according to the OSI model. Special consideration is given to Internet, Intranet, local and wide area network design, technical requirements, operation, and management. Prerequisite(s): INFS 601 
  
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    INFS 752 - Advanced Network Technology and Management

    3 credits
    A study of the configuration, administration, and troubleshooting of a model network environment. Network management strategies including file access, group policies, storage, and security will be examined. This course uses a virtual environment to prepare the student to manage network environments. Prerequisite(s): INFS 750 
  
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    INFS 754 - Network Security/Intrusion Detection

    3 credits
    Provides a comprehensive overview of network security and intrusion detection. Topics include security overview, authentication, attacks and malicious code, communication security, Web security, network security topologies, intrusion detection, firewalls and VPNs, security baselines, security algorithms, physical security, disaster recovery, forensics overview, and other state-of- the-art developments. Prerequisite(s): INFS 750 
  
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    INFS 756 - Cloud Computing and Network Services

    3 credits
    This course will introduce the use of virtual systems and servers to study a new delivery paradigm for the delivery of information technology services. A thorough examination of virtualization technologies will provide students with the foundation to plan, manage, and configure business application models. These network services will be configured on university servers and provide hands-on experiences. Prerequisite(s): INFS 750 
  
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    INFS 760 - Enterprise Modeling and Data Management

    3 credits
    A study of the principles and techniques used in Enterprise Modeling, and Data Management. Topics include the architecture and techniques in designing and implementing enterprise models, database design and implementation technologies. Corequisite(s): INFS 601  
  
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    INFS 762 - Data Warehousing and Data Mining

    3 credits
    The main concepts, components, and various architectures of Data Warehouse. Advanced data analysis and optimization of Data Warehouse Design. Data Warehousing and OLAP tools. Applying data mining algorithms to retrieve highly specialized information or knowledge about the data stored in the Data Warehouse. Prerequisite(s): INFS 605  and INFS 760 
  
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    INFS 764 - Information Retrieval

    3 credits
    Provides hands-on experience with procedural extensions to the SQL language for retrieval and manipulation of data. Topics include data control languages, control structures, looping and branching, local and global variables, exception handling, stored procedures and database triggers, cursors and cursor processing. Prerequisite(s): INFS 605  and INFS 760  
  
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    INFS 766 - Advanced Database

    3 credits
    This course is designed to give the student a strong foundation in the theoretical underpinnings of current database systems. Emphasis will be placed on database theory and will cover such issues as distributed databases, concurrency control, security, optimization, and specialized data models. It will also explore emerging database methodologies and their impact on current practices. Prerequisite(s): INFS 760 
  
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    INFS 768 - Predictive Analytics for Decision Making

    3 credits
    This course provides a broad understanding of the role of predictive analytics for decision-making in different application domains. Students will be exposed to a number of predictive analytics techniques originated in related fields of statistics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. Techniques covered will include statistical techniques such as linear and logistic regression, classification techniques such as decision trees and neural networks, association analysis techniques such as market basket analysis, and cluster analysis techniques such as K-means clustering. Applications of each of the techniques for decision-making applications will be emphasized. Utilization of predictive analytics software is incorporated.
  
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    INFS 770 - Advanced Data Mining Applications

    3 credits
    This course provides an understanding of data mining methodology as well as hands-on experience with applying the methodology in data mining applications.  Throughout the course, students will work closely with data analysis following the data mining methodology.  Different aspects of data mining such as data import, data partitioning, variable transformation, model building, and model comparison will be covered.  Students will participate in one or more major data mining projects in the course.  Through formal presentations students will gain experience in delivering the findings to an audience in an effective manner.  Utilization of predictive analysis software is incorporated. Prerequisite(s): INFS 768  
  
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    INFS 772 - Programming for Data Analytics

    3 credits
    This course will provide an introduction to programming for data analysis with an emphasis on the analysis of large datasets. The programming language we will use is Python.  Phython is a general-purpose programming language that's powerful, easy to learn and fast to code.  It has a mature and growing ecosystem of open source tools for mathematics and data analysis, and is rapidly becoming the language of choice for scientists and researchers of all stripes.  In the first half of the course, students will learn the core of ideas of programming - flow control, input and output, data structures (e.g., arrays, lists, trees and hash tables), iteration and recursion, classes and object-oriented programming - through writing code to deal with Big Data generated by social media sites such as Twitter.  In the second half of the course, students will learn how to use Python for effective data analysis.  Specific topics addressed include: vector computation and mathematics with NumPy, statistical computation with SciPy, working with tubular data with Pandas, and implementing analytics algorithms using Python.
  
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    INFS 774 - Big Data Analytics

    3 credits
    This course provides a broad understanding of the principles underlying Big Data analytics and its applications in different domains using a hands-on approach with a state-of-the-art Big Data platform.  It provides a combination of essential business and technical skills related to Big Data analytics.  It provides a combination of essential business and technical skills related to Big Data analytics.  Business aspects of the course emphasized included (a) understanding the scope and role of Big Data in today's organizations, (b) representative example scenarios and case studies of industry specific applications highlighting Big Data issues - volume, variety, velocity, and veracity, (c) when to consider a Big Data Solution, (d) the integration of Big Data initiatives as part of the overall business strategy to achieve "return to data" and competitive differentiation, and information governance issues.  Technical aspects of the course emphasized include (a) life cycle of a Big Data analytics solution with multiple entry points, b) essential components of a Big Data solution and technology platform, (c) key features of Hadoop and related technologies (e.g., MapReduce, HDFS, NoSQL), (d) performing analytics with predictive models, text analytics, and streaming data, and (e) data visualization and communication of analytical findings.  State-of-the-art tools are integrated throughout the course to provide hands-on exercises with relevant techniques.
  
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    INFS 780 - Information Technology Strategy and Policy

    3 credits
    Focus on the use of information systems technology to develop and maintain a strategic competitive advantage. Topics also demonstrate how Information Systems technologies are used to enhance organizational performance and effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): INFS 720 , INFS 724 , INFS 730 , INFS 750  and INFS 760 
  
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    INFS 788 - Information Systems Project:

    1-3 credits
    Special projects developed to integrate the specialized skills and knowledge presented throughout other courses in the Masters curriculum. Practical knowledge will also be acquired through the application of theoretical concepts to actual computer systems problems and opportunities in a real-world situation. Prior permission and approval of the project is required. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    INFS 789 - Master's Research Problems/Projects Sustaining

    0 credits
    This is a zero-credit instructional method type used to track students who are not currently working with faculty on thesis or doctoral activities. Universities may require students to register under this instructional method type to remain active degree candidates.
  
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    INFS 791 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Includes Directed Study, Problems, Readings, Directed Readings, Special Problems, and Special Projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor
  
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    INFS 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is no wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    INFS 794 - Internship

    1-3 credits
    Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid.  Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study.  A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case for Field Experience courses.
  
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    INFS 805 - Design Research Methods

    3 credits
    The course develops skills needed for conducting research whose aim is to invent methods and techniques that make information systems more effective and efficient. Students will also acquire skills in developing research proposals that follow the design research paradigm and will learn how to publish such research.
  
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    INFS 810 - Qualitative Research Methods

    3 credits
    This course helps develop knowledge and skills in the application and use of qualitative research techniques. The course provides a survey of the methodological literature on qualitative research methods paired with appropriate article-length exemplars in the information systems domain. This course covers a variety of different research strategies including case study, qualitative data collection and analyses techniques, ethnography, meta- ethnography/meta-interpretation. In addition, students acquire skills in developing a research approach, understanding and using a grounded- theory approach, and triangulation methods for strengthening research findings and supporting methodological choices.
  
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    INFS 815 - Quantitative Research Methods

    3 credits
    This course presents quantitative research methods commonly used in information systems research. Topics include (but not limited to) design and analysis of experiments and regression analysis. Regression analysis topics would cover topics related to simple and multiple regression, inferences in regression and correlation analysis, model selection, model validation, and model diagnostics. Design and analysis of experiments would cover topics related to single-factor, two-factor, and multi-factor studies. Information systems research applications will be emphasized using different statistical techniques that will assist IS researchers in designing experiments and drawing inferences from experimental data. Utilization of statistical software is incorporated. Prerequisite(s): INFS 608 
  
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    INFS 820 - Current Issues Health Informatics

    3 credits
    Current trends and issues in health informatics and recent research, theory, and developments in health informatics.
  
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    INFS 830 - Decision Support Systems

    3 credits
    The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the concepts, techniques and application of computer-based decision support systems. The course covers issues pertaining to the design, history, theory, practice, methods and techniques, new developments, and applications of computing technologies to support decision processes and decision-making by individuals, groups and organizations.
  
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    INFS 834 - Knowledge Management

    3 credits
    Knowledge management is an emerging discipline of how to effectively deploy organizational practices, processes, and technology to increase the return on knowledge capital. Knowledge capital includes everything from new drugs designed from research into the human genome to better processes for responding to customer service complaints. This course will examine knowledge management from a general manager's perspective, both as knowledge workers themselves and as those responsible for an organization's overall knowledge effectiveness.
  
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    INFS 838 - Decision Support/Knowledge Management Research

    3 credits
    This course focuses on research issues pertaining to decision support systems and knowledge management. Students will examine and evaluate the research literature from a wide variety of sources, both academic and applied. Students will also indicate various research frontiers associated with decision support systems and knowledge management.
  
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    INFS 848 - Information Assurance/Computer Security Research

    3 credits
    This course focuses on research issues pertaining to information assurance and computer security. Students will examine and evaluate the research literature from a wide variety of sources, both academic and applied. Students will also identify various research frontiers associated with information assurance and computer security.
  
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    INFS 868 - Health Informatics Research

    3 credits
    This course focuses on research issues pertaining to health informatics research. During this seminar course, students will examine and evaluate the research literature from a wide variety of sources, both academic and applied. Students will also identify various research frontiers associated with health information research.
  
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    INFS 889 - Program Sustaining

    0 credits
    Program sustaining course for students in the doctorate program.
  
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    INFS 890 - Seminar

    1-3 credits
    A research seminar course in information systems.
  
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    INFS 891 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depend upon the requirements of the topic.
  
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    INFS 892 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    A topics course in information systems.
  
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    INFS 898D - Dissertation

    1-12 credits
    A formal treatise presenting the results of study submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the applicable degree. The process requires extensive and intensive one-on-one interaction between the candidate and professor with more limited interaction between and among the candidate and other members of the committee.
  
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    INFS 899D - Dissertation Sustaining

    0 credits
    This is a zero-credit instructional method type used to track students who are not currently working with faculty on thesis or research activities. Universities may require students to register under this instructional method type to remain active degree candidates.

Learning Technologies

  
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    LT 712 - Instructional Technology for Active Learning

    3 credits
    This course provides an overview of the application of teaching and learning theories for diverse audiences. The focus will be on creating learning environments that are active and learner centered. This course will emphasize individual and technological approaches to the acquisition, processing, and application of information from a variety of sources. Topics for discussion include problem-based and inquiry-guided learning, curriculum development, on-line learning, constructivist principles, web-based instruction, distance education, and best practices in technology integration.
  
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    LT 716 - Systematic Design of Instruction

    3 credits
    Students will learn concepts and tools for applying systems theory to instructional design, including needs, instructional, learner, and context analyses, objectives, assessment, strategy, development, and evaluation. Addresses client learning needs in various organizational settings: business, industry, government, health care, education, and not-for-profit.
  
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    LT 731 - Multimedia Production

    3 credits
    Students learn principles of visual design, use of sound and color, and hands-on production of text and animated resources for use in educational and training materials for the development of interactive multimedia and hypermedia lessons and presentations. This course will require a summer one-week campus residency.
  
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    LT 741 - Introduction to Distance Education

    3 credits
    This course is an analysis of the history, philosophy, design, and evolution of distance learning systems. Distance learning is a worldwide concept and course uses examples from many countries to emphasize institutional, program and course design methods and approaches. The course assumes a system perspective in the analysis of distance education and the distance learner. The carious components of distance learning systems are introduced and overviewed including a) course development and design; b) course production; c) course delivery; d) learner support; e) evaluation of courses and the methods of cybernetic control of both student performance and instructional effectiveness; and f) research and evaluation of distance learning systems.
  
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    LT 785 - Research Methods in Education Technology

    3 credits
    Designed to develop the skills of the practitioner to be a consumer of computer-based learning research. This course covers basic and applied computer-based education research design and the interpretation statistics.
  
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    LT 791 - Independent Study

    1-3 credits
    Includes Directed Study, Problems, Readings, Directed Readings, Special Problems, and Special Projects.  Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.  The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans.  Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students.  Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic.

Mass Communications

  
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    MCOM 592 - Topics

    1-5 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    MCOM 692 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 509 - Foundational Mathematics

    3 credits
    A foundational course in number theory, abstract algebra, linear algebra and discrete mathematics.

Physical Education

  
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    PE 592 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Science Education

  
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    SCED 593 - Science Education Workshop

    1-3 credits
    Training in the form of a workshop to further content knowledge in one or more areas of the sciences and to increase participants' abilities to apply and transfer scientific ideas and techniques to the classroom.
  
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    SCED 692 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes Current Topics, Advanced Topics, and Special Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.
  
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    SCED 792 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes Current Topics, Advanced Topics, and Special Topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement.

Secondary Education

  
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    SEED 564 - Linguistics/Language P-12

    3 credits


    This course will introduce the key components of language including phonology, phonetics, morphology, syntax and semantics and develop a basic understanding of language acquisition for P-12 students learning English as a new language.

  
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    SEED 592 - Topics

    1-5 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
  
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    SEED 593 - Workshop

    1-3 credits
    Special, intense sessions in specific topic areas. Approximately 45 hours of work is required for each hour of credit. Workshops may vary in time range but typically use a compressed time period for delivery. They may include lectures, conferences, committee work, and group activity.

Special Education

  
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    SPED 592 - Topics

    1-3 credits
    Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.

Statistics

  
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    STAT 700 - Statistical Programming

    3 credits


    Taught by SDSU

    Fundamentals of statistical programming languages including descriptive and visual analytics in R and SAS, and programming fundamentals of SAS and R including logic, loops, macros and functions. Prerequisite(s): STAT 410/510 SAS Programming I or CSC 150 Computer Science I.

  
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    STAT 701 - Modern Applied Statistics I

    3 credits


    Taught by SDSU.

    This course will build upon STAT 541 and assume students have knowledge of SLR, MLR, ANOVA, and basics of statistical inference. The class will start by covering statistical graphics and the associated modern statistical computing language(s). The next section of the class will focus on non- and semi-parametric methods with a focus on the application and interpretation of the methods. The last section of the class will focus on longitudinal and repeated measure models and conclude with an overview of techniques from meta-analysis and large-scale inference. Prerequisite(s): STAT 541 Statistical Methods II and STAT 700  Statistical Programming.

  
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    STAT 702 - Modern Applied Statistics II

    3 credits


    Taught by SDSU

    This course will start with an introduction to data mining techniques from multivariate data such as Principal Component Analysis, Multidimensional Scaling, and Cluster Analysis. From there we will move on to an introduction to supervised learning methods and pattern recognition with a focus on algorithmic methods. The course will finish with an overview of statistical prediction analysis relevant to business intelligence and analytics. Prerequisite(s): STAT 701 .

 

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